DD-WRT Repeater

When we first got high-speed internet we connected Kirsten’s computer to the Linksys router under her desk. Mine and the girls’ computers connected wirelessly, which was fine for the girls but my reception stunk! The wireless connection to my computer was slow and would intermittently drop off-line. That was not an acceptable situation. After much research I decided to switch to Buffalo routers, install DD-WRT firmware in each, and establish a commander/repeater configuration. The new setup works brilliantly!

Buffalo Technologies WHR-G125

The Linksys router we had was a WRT54G V8. This device has a Broadcom chip and runs the Linux operating system. The firmware did not allow the device to be configured as a repeater and third-party firmware was not yet available. I removed the Linksys router and replaced it with two Buffalo Technologies’ WHR-G125 high speed routers. These routers are cheaper than the Linksys, have better range, and are supported by the DD-WRT firmware.

Installing the firmware was a breeze. It was as simple as downloading a file from the website onto my laptop, plugging in the router, and running a batch file in the terminal. After about a dozen timeouts the firmware was flashed to the router and voila! The new firmware allows much greater flexibility and configuration options. The best part–and reason for the entire project–was the ability this firmware allowed me to use one router as a repeater.

WD 500GB MyBookWorld HDD

Kirsten now has one of the routers under her desk transceiving in commander mode connected to the modem and to her computer. I have the other router under my desk operating in repeater mode. It has a wired connection to my desktop computer and two 500 gigabyte Western Digital hard disk drives. It also connects wirelessly to my laptop.

Older Linksys WRT54G routers are supported by the DD-WRT firmware. Check the list of compatible devices on the website before you go shopping. I strongly recommend this open source firmware and the Buffalo products. I have no more dropped signals, no cords running down the hallway, and a super fast reliable connection. And all for less than $100.

1 Comment

  1. Umm… did anyone ever tell you that you’re a geek? I guess so.

    Hey, those external hard drives look nice. Want. :-)

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